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Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Flurry's Lamb


I was very relieved that Flurry the Icelandic sheep had her lamb on Sunday - a beautiful ewe lamb weighing in at 10 lbs.  I had to start class again on Monday at 9 am, so I really didn't want her holding out until this week.   Flurry is a first-time mother, so she is not at all sure about this whole "taking care of baby" thing.  At first, she did lick her lamb clean and paid attention to her, but once she was up and trying to nurse, Flurry decided that she was not at all interested in that part of the responsibility.  She began to head-butt the lamb away.  I had to get into the pen and hold on to Flurry while her lamb nursed.  Fortunately, she doesn't seem to have a problem with that procedure, so now I can simply enter the lambing pen and stand there while the lamb nurses.  If I leave, Flurry resumes the head-butting behaviour.  It's rather annoying for me because it means extra time out of my day, and in addition, it means I need to keep Flurry and her lamb inside the barn until she is nearly weaned, because out in the field, I doubt that I can get close enough to do any good.  Flurry is usually a skittish sheep.  Still, I shouldn't complain because her lamb is absolutely gorgeous.
She has an incredible fleece with white, black, grey, and touches of cinnamon throughout.  She has solid black rear legs and a solid black tail.  Her front legs are lighter with the fawn colour around the knees.
The front of her fleece shows more of the blue-faced Leicester crimp like her father...
...but the back of her fleece is more Icelandic in character.  I'm sure it will be a wonderful spinning fleece.
Now, if I can just get Flurry to be more agreeable to nursing, all will be well!
Lucky Nickel continues to do well and is enjoying time spent outside in the daytime, but she still comes in at night because the other goats don't really want her near them.  Poor girl!
The front garden is coming along really well now and I'm pleased with the choices I made in allium bulbs (wonderfully deer resistant).  The new ginkgo tree is also looking healthy.
On the weekend, we spent many hours installing new fencing on the lower 3 acres to expand the sheep pasture area.  Although it's not ready yet, the fencing is going in well and I'm really pleased with the woven wire fence I chose from Premier Fencing.  It's sturdy and easy to work with.
I managed to escape being damaged by the thorny locust trees...
...but I did manage to get a nasty gash in my leg from some barbed wire left behind by the previous owner of the land.  This necessitated a sudden trip to the doctor on Monday for a tetanus booster, since I hadn't had one in 8 years, and when you have a nasty injury with something rusty, they recommend a booster ahead of the 10-year normal schedule.  Good thing I have so much free time in my day for doctor visits!  HA!!!

13 comments:

sheepsclothing said...

ooh- what a pretty baby! Congrats. That will be a fun fleece to play with.

Michelle said...

I would imagine that Flurry may eventually accept that little beauty wholeheartedly, and you won't have to continue standing guard until weaning. Just watch; one of these days you'll go into the pen and the lamb won't rush for dinner, because she'll have been doing it on her own!

Gail said...

Wonderful stock and a beautiful place.

dogsmom said...

I am learning so much about sheep and goats from blogs. And there is so much more to even scratch the surface. She is a beauty.
I am hoping Michelle is right, that it will only take a few times and Flurry will get the hang of it and accept her responsibility.
Take care of your wound. Sounds nasty. Hopw tetnus shot doesn't make you too sore.

Mom L said...

The new baby is gorgeous and, as she is a big, hungry lamb, I'm sure she will soon "train" Flurry to let her have the milk bar without trouble! I hope so, anyway, as you have enough stuff on your hands. The small garden looks lovely, and the fencing does look nice.

Have you named the new baby yet?

Nancy

Louise said...

The baby is so sweet looking. I, too, hope that Flurry eventually learns that Motherhood isn't all roses and sunshine, and lets her nurse without you having to intervene.

polly's path said...

The new baby is precious!
And i can't blame the outside goats for not wanting to socialize with Lucky-she is, after all, the most beautiful, pampered little doll. I bet they can tell.:)
We have been fencing a part of our woods, and I too have battle wounds to show for it. It will all be worth it tonight when we get to move the big bully goats down there and release the top pen to China, Tardy, and Pebbles.

Flartus said...

Nice update! You've had several beautiful babies this year; hopefully that makes up in a small way for some of your earlier troubles.

Your little garden looks really lovely, much better than that nasty locust! Love the way you casually mention "Oh, yeah, tore open my leg, had to go get a tetanus shot, no big deal." I'd be freaking out over something like that. Guess that's one difference between farmers and us vinyl-sided suburbanites!

Paige Madison said...

Another beautiful lamb. Claire you truly are blessed with such wonderful creatures!

Millie said...

The baby is beautiful. It's nice to hear Lucky Nickel is doing well. I can't believe the rest of the goats wouldn't want to invite such a beautiful girl into the herd.

Chai Chai said...

Icelandics have wonderful wool and great coloring. Fantastic color mix on that young lamb.

What kind of posts are you using for your fence?

PS - We are giving your bug repellent recipe a try for our goats!

taylorgirl6 said...

It's time for an award! Congrats!

http://citychickenfarm.blogspot.com/2010/05/id-like-to-thank-academy.html

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_297fGmt9pkk/S_Uaynf4NcI/AAAAAAAAAxo/pew1r2pcgCk/s1600/blog+award.jpg

Neville Henry Fotheringham said...

That little lamb is precious! You really have some beautiful babies!!!!