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Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Building Project, Interrupted by an Injury

Kelly is only working four days a week now.  He doesn't work on Wednesday any more, so I decided to take today off work to help finish up a couple of projects.  When school starts again, I won't be able to take time off like that, so I figured I should do it while I can!  We decided to continue with our inside-the-big-barn coop project.  We have lost some chickens and had others with frozen feet and toes.  I really get upset about that, so it was time to build a better indoor coop.  We decided to build an 8x8 coop for nighttime use only, inside our Wick Building.

In one corner of the building, we have a 4 x 8 foot brooder for chicks, so we decided to build the larger coop next to that.  Here you can see the overall view of it.  It's built from chipboard mostly, framed with 2x4 lumber.

The main thing we had to do, once the walls were up, was install some insulation.  We used skirtings from our fleeces last year (llama and sheep) that we had kept in bags in the basement, not sure what to do with them!  Suddenly, they were very handy!  We stuffed them down the back wall as the boards went up, along with some foamboard insulation that we had found at a garage sale for $2.  That fully insulated the back wall (which is chipboard framed up against the side of the metal barn wall).


The roof went on, and that was suddenly an excellent new site for storage of things, such as fencing supplies, the summer grass catcher for the mower, spare animal crates, and other such infrequently needed items.  It also gave us more floor space in the barn!  Hooray!

We had a huge bag of R30 fiberglass insulation that we had obtained from someone who was moving and didn't need it.  This proved to be the right opportunity for using it.  Unfortunately, we determined that some mice had made it their home in the barn for a time, but they had vacated.  Despite a few holes, it was still perfectly usable for the ceiling of the new coop.  Kelly decided that it should go up and be covered in black garbage bags.  I had my doubts, which I expressed, but being a woman who likes to be proven right, I let him try....


and try....

 ...and try some more...


...and then he realized it wasn't working, because the staples were pulling through the plastic which is exactly what I said would happen.  Ah, the stubborn streak of the male always arises when construction is underway!!  We then rolled up the bags to make "straps" of a sort, and pushed in the insulation to sort of "hang" it there.


Then, we used some Ondura roofing that we had left over from another project to sandwich the insulation against the ceiling.  We then tucked more skirted fleece in along the sides.

It's nearly done now, except for some roosts and the door.  Kelly went to pick up some hay, so I've come in to write a blog while I recuperate from the injury about to be revealed.  We shall continue with construction later.

At one point we decided the little goatie girls needed grain.  I went in to converse with the little goatie girls and realized a hoof trimming was in order.  I asked Kelly to bring grain and the hoof trimmers, since I was already in the pen with said goatie girls.  I was seated on the ground, holding Opal, who is a darling little goat and not at all difficult.  I had my back to Kelly.  He brought the grain and dumped it over the fence.  He forgot the trimmers entirely.  So, Opal gleefully leapt out of my arms to get at the grain, which was supposed to be a post-trimming treat, and put her horn nearly all the way through the side of my nose in the process.


There was a great deal of blood and a great deal of wailing and commotion and a very sheepish (goatish?) Kelly who realized he had done entirely the wrong thing and had forgotten the entire reason for the grain and meanwhile I was running for the house with blood dripping off the tip of my nose and a hand covered in blood at the same time from holding it to my nose.  Dreadful.

Anyway, after clean up, I realized that it wasn't broken, but it was a very deep cut in the side of my nose below the bridge, that went almost through to the other side.  I am here to tell you that it didn't feel at all good, but I shall survive.  It is now properly bandaged and antibiotic-ointmented, although it does throb rather a lot.  it's a nice straight cut though, so hopefully it will heal well. 


And yes, for anyone who is concerned, I have had my tetanus shot as part of my immigration process about 7.5 years ago and they said it was good enough to last for 10 years.  Whew!

21 comments:

Michelle said...

OWEE-OWEE-OWEE!!! Yikes! But so glad she didn't get you in the eye (oh, what a terrible thought).

Rain and the work week have halted progress on our little building project; I imagine we'll get back at it this Sunday. Your nighttime coop is looking good.

taylorgirl6 said...

Oh no! Wounded in the line of duty! Well consider this the first get well wish. I doubt many people realize that farming is a full-contact sport, yet you face it (no pun intended) bravely every day.

Mary Ann said...

Oh no! I hope your nose (and likely Kelly's bruised ego) both heal well. That HAD to hurt. Ouch!

Joanna@BooneDocksWilcox said...

oh my, like they say, could've been worse. Hope you have a restful night, take some Tylenol.

We get our newborns disbudded just because the horns can do so much damage. It's a few seconds of pain (for them and me) but then the kids go right back to their normal routine, doesn't seem like the pain stays with them.

Cat said...

OUCH! As my Mom says, just be careful and keep it clean. Aren't animals wonderful sometimes? :) But at least you have some new space in the barn. That seems to be a premium, no matter where you are!

Cat

Becky Utecht said...

Oh my gosh, I was thinking you cut yourself hoof trimmer, who would have guessed it would be a freak accident like that! I can only imagine how painful that must have been! You poor dear. Yes, keep it clean and I hope you feel better very soon. Nice work on the chicken shelter.

Gail said...

That's a little high for a nose ring...kidding. Hope you are feeling better. Milk it, moan a little and maybe they will bring you hot chocolate in a big cup.

Laughing Orca Ranch said...

Yikes! Bet that will leave a scar! Now I know why goats are disbudded when kids. I have one goat who isn't and she my angora goat. Her horns are very long and very pointy. I don't know why angoras are typically not disbudded, though, do you?

I always have to pay extra mind to where her head and horns are when I'm around here. And now I know why. gah!
I hope it heals up quickly.

Good luck on the building project. I can't wait to see it when it's done. The chickens will be so cozy.


~Lisa

Sarah Elaine said...

Yowza. Hope it heals soon.

IsobelleGoLightly said...

So sorry you were hurt Claire!! We goats forget everything when that grain is around! I hope Opal gave you a proper kiss and apology (when she had finished eating). Hope you recover very quickly! Kisses from Isobelle!

colorandtexture said...

Eeiikkkk!! Not only are you busy beyond belief, you're injured as well!! I prescribe hot chocolate, warm sock and a good knitting project.

Karen said...

Oh my gosh! Ouch! Wishing you a quick recovery...

Mom L said...

Yeouch! You could do a post about your injuries and include your eye wound photo! I'm sure Opal apologized to you - sure hope Kelly did!!

Nancy

Animals with Opinions said...

i see my human has something in common with you, injuries. nice coop idea.

gerald the injury free goat

Jenny Holden said...

Oh blimey, I can't imagine how much that hurt... or rather, I'd prefer not to! Poor you xx
Everything hurts more in this cold!

Jennifer said...

Glad you are OK! Those horns especially on young goats can be very sharp! We do leave the horns on them but I have taken a file to the very tips of a few, just too round off the tip and make it not quite so sharp.

Flartus said...

Ouch! Oh the sacrifices one makes... Kudos to you two for making so much progress on the indoor coop. I hope the chickens appreciate all your hard work.

Deb said...

You really don't know from one day to the next what these little creatures are going to do - I know that had to hurt :( Hope it heals quickly and doesn't stay painful for long.
The new coop will be great:)

PrairieGarden-Liane said...

Oh Claire!

I hope the throbbing is better at this point. You know how couples unconciously do things that make the other feel badly? Wonder if you will unconciously be tipping your head "just so" when in a "conversation" with Kelly that will show off your scar. Oh dear.

Great pic on the goat, just adorable.

Liane

Animals with Opinions said...

okay my human has read your entire blog. she is now caught up , very jealous, and wants to go live with you. you might take her up on it cause she enjoys trimming hooves(not mine cause she hates me). plus she lived in iowa for awhile when she was in her very early 20S so she will fit in just fine. maybe you could teach her how to knit something other than a square or rectangle. just a thought.


gerald the friendly goat

Farmgirl_dk: said...

Egad and ouch! Maybe look on the bright side and consider it a rather trendy nose-piercing?